Wondrous Waves

Films that don't explicitly tip toe around brutal realities always score highly for me in the movie charts. America is a nation founded on freedom, and this movie draws on every aspect of the word. Released in 2019, Trey Edward Shults confronts race in love and loss for this family drama. Tyler Williams lives comfortably at home with his sister, mother and father, spending his summer days lifting weights and kissing his childhood sweetheart. Until one day, when some troubling news angers the teen and tragedy starts to seep within. It's a secret masterpiece that ripples your sensations throughout; one that I hadn't quite prepared myself for.



Peaks 👍

The narrative is an open ended book for the film. The director switches the protagonist half way through which is utterly effective for the viewer. The first half follows a young, popular football player as his pressures to succeed ultimately spiral out of control. Secondly it switches into the life of his sister Emily, as she comes to terms with her brothers deluded actions. It gave the audience two equally interesting perspectives of the tale; one harrowingly guilty and one emotionally innocent. The 360 camera shots inside the jeeps and mansions locations were incredibly involving as you felt you were spinning in with the rebels. The colours stood out visually with blues, greens, and pinks panning across the beaches of South Florida on the screen. The director creates a young persons mind for the movie, with blaring music from Kendrick Lamor and Kanye West, as the teenagers drive down the highways smoking out of their windows. You feel elated with the drama from the start to finish from the layers being torn away in the story. The director takes you on a journey exploring what can be lost so quickly in time by your mistakes. There is a real sense of pain from the acting throughout that you can't help but feel so engaged with.


Pits 👎

This film has so much to package in, and the edits felt to prolonged in between scenes which made it feel disjointed. If the cuts had matched with the madness of the music it would have flowed more consistently. The actor Sterling K. Brown was sensational as the hard hitting father, and I feel the audience missed out on exploring his reactions to a lot of the drama throughout. There was no indication of his past, upbringing or insight into what made him so strict and tough towards his son.


Waves will drag you deeply in. Usually, movies that look into the lives of teens place a security blanket around the tale, giving a sweet and innocent outlook into their adulthood. What's so overwhelming stunning about this film is that it shows, with the magnificent camera shots, the alarming rate teenage lives are turned upside down due to committing a crime. Our society is thankfully becoming more open, and such pressures on teenagers seems to have decreased. But it does depict the underlying thoughts of not taking your younger days more seriously, as we witness the rise of such devastating crime rates throughout America.


OVERALL: 5



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